Europe

UPG’s in Europe

With less than 2% Evangelical population

UPG // Population // Evangelical % 

Albanian Tosk // 2.3 mil // .4%
Catalonian, Andorran // 25,000 // .35%
Austrian, Bavarian // 7.6 mil // .4%
Kurd // 830,800 // .19%
Algerian, Arabic // 660,700 // .6%
Arab, Moroccan // 620,900 // .2%
Arab, Maghrebi // 775,900 // .08%
Shawiya // 116,000 // .02%
Fleming // 6.4 mil // 1.14%
Arab // 59,500 // .6%
Turk // 3 mil // .0%
Mongol // 4,700 // 1.2%
Bengali // 584,000 // .07%
Fulani // 44,000 // .17%
Gujarati // 140,000 // .06%
Japanese // 96,000 // .4%
Soninke // 41,000 // 0%
Kazakh // 23,000 // .2%
Mainfrankisch // 4.8 mil // 2%
Persian // 397,000 // .3%
Azerbaijani // 326,000 // .1%
Jews // 1.4 mil // .07%
Pashtun // 240,000 // 0%
Parsee // 4,300 // 0%
Urdu // 159,800 // 0%
Mocheno // 2,000 // 0%
Somali // 166,200 // .15%
Tibetan // 1,000 // 0%
Cypriots // 62,000 // .5%
Pomak // 103,500 // .4%
Moor // 31,500 // 0%
Wolof // 122,900 // .7%
Chechen // 164,000 // 0%
Albanian, Gheg // 1.5 mil // .4%
Bosniak // 2.6 mil // .06%
Bulgarian // 6.5 mil // 1.8%
Croat // 4.9 mil // .4%
Czech // 10 mil // .7%
Arab, Iraqi // 239,600 // .4%
Russian //686,400 // 1.1%
Greek // 9.8 mil// .39%
Gypsy, Hung. // 304,000 // 2%
Irish // 4.2 mil // 1.2%
Arab, North African // 1.2 mil // .05%
Italian // 32 mil // .96%
Albanian, Kosovars // 1.6 mil // .6%
Liechtensteiner // 26,600 // .3%
Luxembourger // 376,000 // .3%
Macedonian // 1.8 mil // .3%
Maltese // 466,000 // 1.3%
Montenegrin // 354,600 // .2%
Polish // 39 mil // .3%
South Asian // 5.1 mil // 1.02%
Aromanian // 325,900 // .8%
Serb // 7.5 mil // .5%
Slovak // 5 mil // 1.1%
Slovene // 2 mil // .09%
Spaniard // 26 mil // .9%
Lombard // 3.5 mil // .7%
Arab, Lebanese // 213,100 // .5%
Berber, Kabyle // 57,300 // 1.25%
Yahudic // 6,600 // .01%

1995-05 Smith, Troy Blagoevgrad, Bulgaria

Population
528,000,000

SPIRITUALLY LOST 97.31%
514,000,000

UNREACHED PEOPLE GROUPS 1,034

AG CONSTITUENTS 1,734,902

AG CHURCHES  10,995

AG MINISTERS  15,507

MISSIONARIES 514

Once a center for the spread of Christianity, Europe now is home to a population that knows little about the truth of the gospel.

Throughout history, Europe played a major role in the spread of Christianity around the world. However, over the centuries, the spirit of revival in Europe that prompted great moves of God, such as the Great Awakening of the 18th century, diminished into ritual and apathy.

Early in the 20th century, the outpouring of the Holy Spirit and the Azusa Street revival in Los Angeles, California, reached across the Atlantic. As Spirit-baptized European believers returned home to tell of their infillings, indigenous Pentecostal fellowships sprang up.

World War II had a significant impact on the church in Europe. As the United States contributed to relief efforts, the number of AG missionaries in Europe grew. During the next several decades, Bible schools were established in several European countries. Today many Europeans describe themselves as Christians, but they lack a personal understanding of the gospel. Less than 10 percent of people in Western Europe attend church at least once a month.

Across the continent, immigrants have come to Europe seeking opportunity and better lives. Many of them are from people groups that have little or no access to the gospel. The European church is faced with both the challenge — and the opportunity — to make a difference for Christ within its own continent and also in unreached nations around the world.

 

 


 

bforsmanEurope